2014 Bills

Last year, nearly 60 meetings were achieved between business leaders and legislators to discuss the ten following bills:

HB 910 (Villanueva) & Renewable energy property; tax credits for placing into service

Establishes beginning with taxable year 2014 tax credits for placing into service renewable energy property. The credit would equal 40 percent of the costs paid or incurred to place the renewable energy property into service, not to exceed $3 million for any individual piece of renewable energy property. The bill provides that credits in excess of $250,000 would be allowed in three equal taxable year installments. The amount of tax credits otherwise allowed would be proportionally reduced to reflect any public grants, bonds, or other public moneys used in funding the renewable energy property. The bill defines renewable energy as energy derived from sunlight, wind, falling water, biomass, waste, landfill gas, municipal solid waste, wave motion, tides, and geothermal power, but not including energy derived from coal, oil, natural gas, or nuclear power. Read More…

SB 653 (Norment) –Renewable energy property; grants for placing into service, Renewable Energy Property Grant Fund

Establishes, beginning with fiscal year 2016, grants for placing into service renewable energy property. The grant would equal 35 percent of the costs paid or incurred to place the renewable energy property into service, not to exceed $2.5 million for any individual piece of renewable energy property. The bill provides that grants in excess of 2.5 percent of the total program appropriation for the relevant fiscal year would be paid in three equal calendar year installments. No grant would be awarded for renewable energy property that generated electricity within the 12 months preceding the date of the grant application or renewable energy property paid for by utility ratepayer funds. The bill defines renewable energy as energy derived from sunlight, wind, falling water, biomass, waste, landfill gas, municipal solid waste, wave motion, tides, or geothermal power, but not including energy derived from coal, oil, natural gas, or nuclear power. Read More…

SB 418 (Hangar) – Real and personal property taxes; exemption for solar energy equipment, facilities, or devices

Exempts from real and personal property tax business-owned or business-operated solar energy equipment, facilities, or devices that collect, generate, transfer, or store thermal or electric energy. This bill incorporates SB 512 and is identical to HB 1239.

HB 1061 (Surovell) – Electric utility regulation; renewable energy portfolio standard program

Establishes minimum percentages of the RPS Goals that Dominion, defined as a Phase II utility, is required to meet from distributed generation energy sources. Dominion may meet this goal by applying renewable energy certificates from any combination of (i) energy derived from renewable energy by a system capable of net energy metering located on the distribution grid, (ii) renewable thermal energy from solar water heating systems located in the Commonwealth, or (iii) a financial contribution to the Voluntary Solar Resource Development Fund. The distributed generation minimum starts at 5 percent in reporting year 2015 and is 25 percent in reporting year 2024 and thereafter. Read more…

HB 879 (Yost) Electric utility regulation; net energy metering by municipalities, etc.

Authorizes municipal renewable energy net metering projects. Participating municipalities are authorized to aggregate the electric energy load of their governmental buildings, facilities, and any other governmental operations requiring the consumption of electric energy for the purpose of net energy metering from a renewable energy generating facility. To be eligible, the generation facility for the municipal renewable energy net metering project shall use as its sole energy source solar power, wind power, or aerobic or anaerobic digester gas and landfill gas; not have an aggregate generation capacity of more than five megawatts unless a utility elects a higher capacity; be located on land owned or controlled by the municipality; be interconnected and operated in parallel with an electric utility’s transmission and distribution facilities; and be used primarily to provide energy to metered accounts of the municipality. Read more…

HB 906 Electric utility regulation; net energy metering by municipalities, etc. (Krupicka)

Authorizes municipal renewable energy net metering projects. Participating municipalities are authorized to aggregate the electric energy load of their governmental buildings, facilities, and any other governmental operations requiring the consumption of electric energy for the purpose of net energy metering from a renewable energy generating facility. To be eligible, the generation facility for the municipal renewable energy net metering project shall use as its sole energy source solar power, wind power, or aerobic or anaerobic digester gas and landfill gas; not have an aggregate generation capacity of more than five megawatts unless a utility elects a higher capacity; be located on land owned, leased, or operated by the municipality; be interconnected and operated in parallel with an electric utility’s transmission and distribution facilities; and be used primarily to provide energy to metered accounts of the municipality. Read more…

SB 350 ( Edwards) – Net energy metering by municipalities & multifamily customer-generators; projects authorized

Authorizes municipal renewable energy net metering projects. Participating municipalities are authorized to aggregate the electric energy load of their governmental buildings, facilities, and any other governmental operations requiring the consumption of electric energy for the purpose of net energy metering from a renewable energy generating facility. To be eligible, the generation facility for the municipal renewable energy net metering project shall use as its sole energy source solar power, wind power, or aerobic or anaerobic digester gas and landfill gas; not have an aggregate generation capacity of more than five megawatts unless a utility elects a higher capacity; be located on land owned or controlled by the municipality; be interconnected and operated in parallel with an electric utility’s transmission and distribution facilities; and be used primarily to provide energy to metered accounts of the municipality. Read more…

HB 879 (Yost) Electric utility regulation; net energy metering by municipalities, etc.

Authorizes municipal renewable energy net metering projects. Participating municipalities are authorized to aggregate the electric energy load of their governmental buildings, facilities, and any other governmental operations requiring the consumption of electric energy for the purpose of net energy metering from a renewable energy generating facility. To be eligible, the generation facility for the municipal renewable energy net metering project shall use as its sole energy source solar power, wind power, or aerobic or anaerobic digester gas and landfill gas; not have an aggregate generation capacity of more than five megawatts unless a utility elects a higher capacity; be located on land owned or controlled by the municipality; be interconnected and operated in parallel with an electric utility’s transmission and distribution facilities; and be used primarily to provide energy to metered accounts of the municipality. Read more…

HB 818 (Lopez) – Energy and Environment, Virginia Commission on; established, report

Establishes the Virginia Commission on Energy and Environment as a legislative commission to review and recommend steps to implement the Virginia Energy Plan. The Commission is charged, among other things, with the power and duty to (i) undertake studies and gather information and data; (ii) make recommendations as may be necessary to accomplish its purposes as set forth in the legislation; (iii) make special studies of and reports on measures to secure Virginia’s energy future; (iv) establish advisory committees composed of persons with special expertise not represented by individuals serving on the Commission; (v) seek, accept, and expend gifts, grants, or donations to enable the Commission to carry out its objectives; (vi) review and make recommendations on legislation affecting energy policy to the General Assembly; and (vii) report annually on its activities during the preceding year to the Governor and the General Assembly.

HB 1001 (Yancey) – Electric utilities; on-bill financing programs for eligible energy efficiency measures

Requires electric utilities to file with the State Corporation Commission a plan for implementing an on-bill financing program. An on-bill financing program allows eligible residential customers to arrange through the utility for the installation of energy efficiency measures that are projected to have estimated electricity savings sufficient to exceed the costs of the measure by not less than 10 percent, without any required upfront payment. The customer will be allowed to pay back the costs of the measures through an agreement, not to exceed five years in duration, that provides for a designated charge to be placed on the customer’s billing statement.

HB 808 (Lopez) – Electrical utility facilities; consideration of stability of fuel prices

Requires the State Corporation Commission, when required to approve the construction of any electrical utility facility, to consider the long-term price stability of any fuels used in the generation of energy from the facility.